The new Prime Air delivery drone from Amazon can travel further than its predecessor.

The Scout sidewalk delivery robot’s testing was just stopped, and other actions taken by Amazon imply that it would scale back its experimental ventures. However, it appears that Prime Air’s delivery drone development is still in full swing as the e-commerce behemoth just unveiled a preview of its upcoming model. The MK30 was created to be lighter than the MK27-2, the current model. According to the photographs posted by the e-commerce giant, it will still have six rotors like its predecessor, but it no longer has a whole hexagonal frame.

To test consumer interest in having their items scanned and dropped into their yards, the e-commerce giant will begin offering drone deliveries in College Station, Texas, and Lockeford, California, later this year. For these experiments, Amazon will make use of the MK27-2 model, which won’t be ready until 2024. The MK30, according to the manufacturer, can fly in light rain, has a higher temperature tolerance than the MK27-2, and has a longer range. Additionally, the flight science team at Prime Air has created new propellers that seem to reduce the new drone’s perceived noise by about 25%.

The company’s drones aren’t particularly loud to begin with; the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Assessment (PDF) for College Station drone package delivery states that it is “not expected” that the noise MK27-2 emits will alter the behavior of wildlife. However, Amazon considers drone noise reduction to be a major engineering problem and thinks the MK30’s overall attributes will encourage customers to “select drone delivery more frequently.” Although the business has not yet made clear how it intends to increase drone mail delivery, it has promised to “make the service available to additional clients in the next months and years.”

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Source: www.engadget.com

Originally posted 2023-06-14 15:13:29.

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